Time & Its Persistence

Forthcoming Issue #7 will explore time, the persistence of time, and the various permutations of time. With a title that itself permutes in the call for submissions: nothing but; time   /   nothing, but time   /   nothing but: time   /   nothing ^ but ^ time   /   nothing but time   /   (nothing) but time   /   nothing, but time, time we know as something that beats the carcasses of our dead bodies long after we have gone yet does not exist for us once we are gone.

Borges declares: “Eternity, whose shredded copy is time,” and in doing so recognizes both the utter arbitrariness of qualitatively pinpointing eternity (ie. eternity ≠ infinity) and acknowledges the painful suffering of seeing anything for too long.

László Krasznahorkai pleads: “We are living in the apocalypse. The first moment of time was the first moment of apocalypse and death. Please, don’t fear the apocalypse.”

Today, in this humble gallery, we explore the seeing of time that occur through selected paintings. It is not raining outside now, but eventually it will be. The rain, like death, like time, like our hands reaching towards the horizon, is inevitable.

The Persistence of Memory, Salvador Dali.

The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali, 1931.

Time Transfixed by René Magritte, 1938.

Time Transfixed by René Magritte, 1938.

Time of the Old Women by Francisco Goya, 1820.

Time of the Old Women by Francisco Goya, 1820.

Shoes by Vincent Van Gogh, 1888.

Shoes by Vincent Van Gogh, 1888.

Fleeting Time Thou Hast Left Me Old by Ivan Albright, 1928.

The Four Trees by Claude Monet, 1891.

The Four Trees by Claude Monet, 1891.

Living Time by Nicolas Carone, 1956.

Living Time by Nicolas Carone, 1956.

The Mirage of Time by Yves Tanguy, 1954.

The Mirage of Time by Yves Tanguy, 1954.

Time by Jan van Bronckhorst, 1656.

Growing Time (Still-life monster series) by Lee Seungae, 2008.

Growing Time (Still-life monster series) by Lee Seungae, 2008.

time, memor, existence

Time, Memory and Existence by Ji Seok Cheol, 2010.

Winter - Night - Old Age and Death by Caspar David Friedrich, 1803.

Winter – Night – Old Age and Death by Caspar David Friedrich, 1803.

***

(Also see  Chris Daley’s Thoughts on Time After Viewing Christian Marclay’s “The Clock” in the new issue of The Collagist)

 



Comments are closed.